Showing posts with label thoughts. Show all posts
Showing posts with label thoughts. Show all posts

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

To Anyone Who Could Be A Writer

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I've always wanted to write this post, and also forgive the lack of posts but I have a lot of good news coming your way! But for now, I felt that the time was right for me to write a message to anyone who could be a writer.

Writing is a form of art, and it has many categories you see, if you are already doing the work, that means you should definitely consider getting the most out of it. So to all of those who simply dream of becoming great poets or authors I say: wake up, it's time to get to work. The thing about writing is that it's a habit and not something you do every once in a while. In the words of Mr. Chaker Khazaal (the most influential Arab of the world) "writing is like praying, you shouldn't give an excuse as to why you're not doing it".

In my humble journey, I've been blessed to have met a lot of great individuals who have amazing talent, hopes and aspirations... But it's funny that these are the ones who are filled with doubt and consumed by the idea that for some reason they're not good enough. But what are they comparing themselves to? Traditionally published books go through at least a dozen rounds of editing, where every round consists of the following:

  1. Developmental Editing
  2. Copy Editing
  3. Proofreading 
If you believe that your work is sub-par to them, well of course it's going to be, since you are competing and comparing your own style of writing to others, it doesn't work that way. That's why we write the stories we want to read. WE the authors are the ones creating whatever world we want to create. We are the ones researching the materials we want to shed light on, so to compare yourself to another writer or more so your book to another is the worst crime you can commit to yourself. 

Some will love your work, others will not -that is a given, and that's the beauty of sharing your work with others, they're allowed to disagree with you, but you aren't allowed to quit because of it since the more you write the better you get. Think of it this way: every mistake you make, is one that you won't repeat in your future, so grind, write, make mistakes and learn from them!

That's all for now, 

Until next time,
Write on.

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

My Thoughts on NaNoWriMo

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I had a couple of interesting discussions to say the least with a couple of friends about NaNoWriMo and generally, they were quite pissed off at me at the end. Let me explain...

What is it?

First, if you don't know what it is, NaNoWriMo is basically this ritual during the month of November where writers take a pledge to write and finish an entire novel. Yeah, one month, one novel. It couldn't be better than as if you were ordering food from your favorite restaurant (what? I'm a bit hungry at the moment, don't mind the metaphor).

So, my friends asked me if I was going to "take the pledge" this time seeing as I'm already working on my second book and stuff, and they were next to shocked when I told them "I hate it."

Look, I get it, the whole idea and concept behind this is to motivate writers to simply write and get them practicing and whatever. But the fact of the matter is, a good novel cannot be written in one month! Holy shit, if you could do that why not write a book every single month as opposed to focusing on only one? And don't start with the "that's not the point" bull...

I write about 1.5K words a day (and on a good day I write about 3K), so in theory I should be able to do this quite easily. But my problem with this is, that writers who plan on participating often plan the book ahead. They plot it out extremely well and then it's simply a matter of finishing a draft. Good? Yeah I guess. So if you can plot a book so well as to finish it in one month, why are you not doing it as a standard practice?

Why I hate it?

I think it's really demeaning for other writers when they hear about NaNoWriMo. Shouldn't every month be considered a month of writing? It seriously belittles the amount of research, hard work, re-write and editing that authors do when it comes to writing. It is just not as simple as they make it sound to be. Finishing a novel in one month? Seriously? And the excuses that you get "I would write a book every month if I had the time" - Ah! They lose simply by pleading to that excuse.

In the end, I'm really not against NaNoWriMo or anyone who participates in it, in fact power to them for actually getting a draft completed in such a short time but I just don't see myself putting that much pressure on myself (books... you see are really evil). I just have a problem with the message that they portray to the rest of the world.

These are totally my own opinion, and if you disagree with me, then let me know. Leave a comment, or tweet me. Let's talk about it.

Until next time,
Write on.

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Thoughts on Writing - Update

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Today, I wanted to talk about some of my thoughts surrounding the publishing industry and I'll discuss the progress of Dragon Tooth as well (it's still scheduled for June I promise).

Lately, a lot of things have been on my mind and I thought I could share them with you guys and maybe it'll help anyone who is going through something similar.

The first thing is, I've started my last round of editing Dragon Tooth (in order to prepare for the release) and I didn't realize how much I actually improved throughout the process of writing it. Not only Dragon Tooth, but almost all of the stories that came after it improved my skills significantly.

I remember reading somewhere a quote by Stephen King "write your first book, finish it, leave it on the side. Write another book. Publish the second one." or something along those lines. The idea behind this quote is, writing is really a practice. The more you do it, the better you get.

I've been invited to some events lately, and there was one, from Global Vision, which is basically a company that works with colleges around the world to facilitate the application process for students who want to pursue their education further.

One of the requirements was to write a proposal of up to 2000 to 3000 words, and when the speaker said that, I could swear I sensed everyone going "Oh god . . ." and I wasn't amused. Not one bit. My daily quota has risen from 500 words per day to 1500, and it almost happens automatically nowadays and I don't even pay attention to it. I just find myself taking it scene by scene and it seems to work.

My point is, my writing has improved a lot since I decided to publish Dragon Tooth, but I do understand that I'm just at the beginning of this journey.

That's it for today, but next week, I'll be sharing some helpful tips to self-publishing.

Have a great day!

Until next time,
Write on.