Showing posts with label decision. Show all posts
Showing posts with label decision. Show all posts

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

6 Things You Shouldn't Say To a Writer



I decided to do something fun today, since my book's release I've been getting a lot of these comments and I kinda don't blame them because not many know the amount of blood sweat and tears that writers put into their work. They tend to underestimate the level of dedication and commitment that is needed to fully finish something, and I get that they think that writing a book is fun but the truth is it's really not. Books are evil bastards that suck the writer's soul dry. So, here's 6 things you shouldn't say to a writer!

1- Can I get a copy for free? 

No. You cheap bastard. I get it, if your friends with a writer its so tempting to just get the damn thing for free, but you should always remember that sales improve a book's ranking, and a good book ranking means a good author ranking (on Amazon at least) so if you really want to support your writer friend, buy the damn thing (there's a hack to get it for free. Just promise to write a genuine review and they'll give it to you)!

2- It's like Twilight meets Harry Potter.

Stop this. 

3- How many copies did you sell?

Okay, so if there's anything called privacy and if your writer friend has any sense, he's not gonna answer this. He might be selling 10, 50, or even 100. This is just an embarrassing question to answer. Think of it this way, would you ask your friend who just got hired how much he's making? Didn't think so. 

4- It reminded me a lot of Twilight. Not in a bad way, but in a good way!

No really... Stop it. 

5- Oh so you're a writer, you know I've always wanted to write but couldn't find the time.

Okay, so this is kinda common and it really takes the cake. Writing is an excruciating process that takes years to accomplish. Why do you think that your writer friend just stared at an empty screen and the book magically manifested? The difference between a writer and someone who's not is that extra mile really. Anyone can start working on a book, but not everyone finishes one. So just avoid saying this. 

6- It was good, but you should add this part.

Now, if there is one thing all writers hate, is suggestions. Don't get me wrong, you definitely should tell them what you thought didn't work for you. For example you can say "I found that part a bit dragging and it just took the element of surprise out of everything. It was really predictable what would happen next" < THIS HELPS. "Oh, there's a problem but you should definitely like not reveal the tattoo that the character had in this scene. You could try to add a new scene where abhdbasd happens. < THIS DOES NOT.

I hope this fun to read! And if you enjoyed it, don't forget to share and comment below what you think!

Until next time,
Write on.

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Book Review: Manuel of the Warrior of Light by Paulo Colheo

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I've been a fan of this author for a very long time, since the Alchemist. His story alone is enough to inspire every author in the world to believe in himself and just go for his dreams. Anyways, I've read this a long time ago and thought I would share with you my opinion.

Manuel of the Warrior of Light is an incredible piece written by Paulo Colheo, and it follows the events surrounding a person who meets an angel like figure that he instantly connects with, and spends a long time trying to look for her again. Years and years pass and the guy had finally moved on, but eventually, he goes to the place where they would meet (having came to terms with the fact that he would never see her again) and behold. She is waiting for him.

Not a day older, she hadn't aged at all. When he asks about her, she responds by giving him a notebook that is empty, and she asks him to write about the Warrior of Light.

This book not only is helpful, but the intro alone is enough to send shivers down your spine. It's not a 'book' per say, but a book of quotes and their explanation as to how an ideal individual would behave, think and feel in a world like ours.

If I had to make a bold statement, I would say that this book is his personal views and hard learned lessons that he wanted to pass on to every person who was dear to him.

All and all, the Manuel of the Warrior of Light is sure to give you a pleasant read throughout, and you are bound to see yourself in some of the quotes as clear as the sun (during daytime... I know... just in case).

4.5/5

Until next time,
Write on

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Answering Your Writing Questions - Part 1

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For this week, I decided to take to Twitter, and answer five questions from the popular hashtag #AskAuthor. Keep in mind these will be my opinion only. I'll try to answer to the best of my abilities, but it will be just that. My opinion. Which you might agree with, and you might not. It's fine.

Q.1 What are you reading right now, and how is it impacting your writing?
I've actually just finished reading "Paladin" by Sally Slater, which has been a phenomenal read to be honest. I've finished that book in 2 days and it left me wanting more. To be honest, had I not finished writing Dragon Tooth, I would not have read it (whenever I'm writing a specific genre, I don't like to read anything related as to not have my mind be affected by the tiniest bits). While it was just an incredible read in something that I found very interesting (the politics, the choices... the characters seemed all too real) and I had a little taste how it feels to kill a character from the other side (my oh my, how pissed I was!).
Q.2 How do you come up with a title for your book?
Well, some writers really struggle when it comes to coming up with a title for their book, but I don't, honestly. You just gotta relax and let it flow, write, write and write. The title will come to you eventually. It might be just as you finished writing it, or sometimes even before you started it. When it came to Secret of the Moonlight(which you can read for FREE on Wattpad!) for example, the title was ready way before I wrote even a sentence. While Dragon Tooth, came to me when I finished the first chapter. Remember, your title has to be unique and catchy. Something that grabs attention. Try to also avoid silly names or parodying another popular book... for example (Throne of Games). Always remember to Google your title, before settling on it.
Q.3 When writing a novel, do you first make an outline? If so, do you stick to it? 
 I find that an outline definitely helps me power through anything I write because ultimately I know where I'm going. But even when that sometimes can be too restrictive, I don't feel burdened by it so occasionally, I might change a few details here and there as I'm writing (if it makes total sense, and not just because I want to change something) but I would say I stick to the outline about 85% of the time. I've had a lot of instances where I wanted to reverse something, but I just fought the urge because I knew that everything that happened was playing to a bigger end. It's much more easier to create a well founded story, rich with twists from the planning board.
Q.4 Is Blogging Still Relevant for Writers and Authors?
 Absolutely, blogging I think is a very important aspect and step in building a readership and have somewhere that anyone can go back to the writer and read more from him. It means a lot to readers actually, and almost every famous and established writer does this (George R R Martins as well!).
Q.5 A few beta-readers keep suggesting to change particular scenes in my novel and I'm not sure what to do...
It's very important to listen to your beta readers, but also to know who to approach. Someone who reads non-fiction would give you horrible advice when it comes to fiction for example. You gotta ensure that the beta reader is actually a fanatic of the genre you are going into. But still, it generally means something no matter what. The best advice I can give regarding this will be in the form of a quote by Neil Gaiman "When people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong."

That's it for this post, if you'd like to see more questions, feel free to throw them at me at m@infrangilis.com or simply leave a comment. I plan on doing this a bit more frequently.

Until next time,
Write on.

Friday, September 11, 2015

Should You Change Your Decisions in Writing?

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Sometimes, when you are so deeply rooted within a world of your own, you begin to wonder how was it that you got this far? I have always dealt with hard decisions when writing a story because, in a way, I do not control the story... The characters do. What I write is strictly character-driven plots for the sole purpose of realism in the piece of writing.

I learned that because I plot out how the story ends up before actually writing the details of what and how things end up happening. Did I ever wish that I could change a decision for the betterment of my own satisfaction? Yes, did I ever do it? No.

I think it is very disrespectful when an author changes what he originally planned simply because they lacked the will to carry on with whatever they planned. Sure, you might have come to a new and better idea and justify it all you want, but the truth is, if it is something hard for you to write, imagine how the readers feel. Exactly, you want that.

I remember when I saw an interview of George R.R Martins where he spoke about how he wrote the Red Wedding. When it came down to it, he couldn't actually write it, but instead went ahead and wrote the aftermath of what happened, and then came back to it finally.